Do THIS, not THAT when writing multiple-choice questions

Quick take
Research shows that multiple-choice questions can, when well-written, simulate performance, especially if we are asking about decisions and steps to take.
Description

Research shows that multiple-choice questions can, when well-written, simulate performance, especially if we are asking about decisions and steps to take.

5 major multiple-choice question flaws are found below:

  1.  They are unclear or otherwise poorly written.
  2.  They are too easy to guess.
  3.  They test recall of content not use of knowledge.
  4.  They don't measure what they intend to measure.
  5.  They end up testing something else, rather than evaluating to see if the test taker knows the content.

Research shows that negatively worded questions are harder to understand and easier to mess up when answering.

Do this: Instead of writing negatively worded multiple-choice questions, phrase them positively. So, instead of asking, "Which of these should you not do…," consider using this prompt,  "Which of these is an approved safety measure…"

Do this: Make sure that wording does not give away the answer to the question.